Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

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Rating: 3/5

No surprise, I was on cloud nine when I got to know JK Rowling (et al) was coming up with a new book. It didn’t matter if it was a novel or a play or just a short story. Being a Harry Potter fanatic, anything related to this magnificent series could get me jumping in joy. It would sound so silly and foolish, but the moment I held this beautiful hard cover book, I felt such endearing warmth. I guess only a fellow Harry Potter addict would understand this emotion.

From the time of the announcement, it was very clear that the book was a play and not a novel. The story resumes from where it left in the epilogue of the 7th book. It was quite a different experience to read Harry Potter as a play. There are no deep descriptions of the magical world as the entire narration is written as it would happen on stage. The entry and exit of characters, how the actors/characters give their expressions, the pauses, the beats- it definitely took me time to adjust to the transition. We don’t get an in-depth insight into any of the characters. May be on stage the emotions would be conveyed by the actors better, but as a book, you miss the emotional connect to the characters. It’s just a disappointment that this book could have scored better if it had been a novel than a play. I wish a novel version is released for the same story.

The play focuses on Albus Severus Potter and Scorpious Malfoy predominantly. They share an unbreakable friendship, quite opposite to what their fathers had when they were at school. Harry and Albus have a very strained relationship. Albus struggles being a Potter, the son of The Boy Who Lived. He is constantly bullied at school. Scorpious, on the other hand, is nothing like his father Draco. He is innocent and funny, and loyal. Both of them team up for an adventure, which goes horribly wrong, and therefore their parents have to step in to right their wrong. Vague enough? I didn’t want to divulge anything about the story.

The play has everything a Harry Potter fan would need, but everything caters to the stage. Hence, this limits the fantasising and visualizing element of the reader. We don’t get to see and feel Hogwarts like the way we did while reading the series. The spells and the other magic are hard to visualize, probably because the language used is for a script. The pace of the play is also on top speed, years pass in a matter of two pages. We don’t get to read THE Harry-Ron-Hermoine conversations. Ron, for one, is written as a completely funny character, forcefully funny, that it doesn’t seem like Ron at all. The older version of the trio isn’t as entertaining as I expected. When the trio get to Hogwarts, they address their once Professors by their first name or last name, which is kind of very hard to digest. I mean, Harry called Dumbledore as Dumbledore is, I don’t know, kind of shocked me. This magical world, after 19-20 years isn’t something I would want to be in. I am happy to be stuck in the past, in the old Hogwarts than the current one. In the entire 7 book series, the one thing which I found really hard to comprehend was the concept of the Time-turner (Book 3). This entire play is based on that and hence the read was pretty difficult for me.

The friendship of Albus and Scorpious is very endearing. To see a Potter and a Malfoy bond is truly magical. Harry has turned very boring. Ron and Hermoine are dull too. The play lacks the dry wit. I wish they had brought Dumbledore back in some way and given him a heroic scene of some sort. It’s still hard to get over his death in Book 6. I loved, loved, loved Severus Snape in this play. He was fantastic. Even if it was for just a few pages, he leaves a strong mark. That’s when I realised, Harry Potter (series) couldn’t have been a cult, a classic, if not for all the supporting characters- Snape, Dumbledore, McGonagall, Hagrid, Longbottom, Weasleys- they all brought in such beautiful charm to the series. With their presence very meagre in this play, I didn’t feel belonged in this Harry Potter world.

Yet-Yet-Yet. It would be unfair to compare this play with the series. The writers had made it very clear from the beginning that this was a play. Hence it would be wrong to expect it to be like a novel, written like a novel. The look and feel of the book is very good. It’s definitely a page turner. I haven’t read many plays and hence I couldn’t judge how effectively this one is written as a play. But as a story, it has a very interesting plot and manages to keep the readers interested till the end; though I am sure every reader will feel a void while reading.

Read it to feel nostalgic.

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3 thoughts on “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

    guptasaab said:
    August 22, 2016 at 8:30 am

    wow, this is so well written! everything flows together and remains on topic — the differences between book vs. play for story-telling! wonderful to read! really enjoyed it!

    Like

    guptasaab said:
    August 22, 2016 at 8:31 am

    also, i have to agree with your assertion that the supporting characters were what made the original series so good. their presence is underrated.

    Like

      mypanoramicviewblog responded:
      August 22, 2016 at 12:07 pm

      I really felt the difference while reading the play as to how much the supporting characters played a strong role apart from the main characters. HP is no fun without them. I am waiting to read the eBook on Lupin. He is one of my favourite characters.

      Like

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